Drug: Celontin

Celontin (methsuximide) is an anticonvulsant succinimide, chemically designated as N,2-Dimethyl-2phenylsuccinimide, with the following structural formula: Each Celontin capsule contains 150 mg or 300 mg methsuximide, USP. Also contains starch, NF. The capsule contains colloidal silicon dioxide, NF; D&C yellow No. 10; FD&C yellow No. 6; gelatin, NF; and sodium lauryl sulfate, NF.

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Gastrointestinal System Gastrointestinal symptoms occur frequently and have included nausea or vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, weight loss, epigastric and abdominal pain, and constipation. Hemopoietic System Hemopoietic complications associated with the administration of methsuximide have included eosinophilia, leukopenia, monocytosis, and pancytopenia with or without bone marrow suppression. Nervous System Neurologic and sensory reactions reported during therapy with methsuximide have included drowsiness, ataxia or dizziness, irritability and nervousness, headache, blurred vision, photophobia, hiccups, and insomnia. Drowsiness, ataxia, and dizziness have been the most frequent side effects noted. Psychologic abnormalities have included confusion, instability, mental slowness, depression, hypochondriacal behavior, and aggressiveness. There have been rare reports of psychosis, suicidal behavior, and auditory hallucinations. Integumentary System Dermatologic manifestations which have occurred with the administration of methsuximide have included urticaria, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and pruritic erythematous rashes. Cardiovascular Hyperemia. Genitourinary System Proteinuria, microscopic hematuria. Body as a Whole Periorbital edema. Read the Celontin (methsuximide) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effectsLearn More »

Source: http://www.rxlist.com

Optimum dosage of Celontin (methsuximide) must be determined by trial. A suggested dosage schedule is 300 mg per day for the first week. If required, dosage may be increased thereafter at weekly intervals by 300 mg per day for the three weeks following to a daily dosage of 1.2 g. Because therapeutic effect and tolerance vary among patients, therapy with Celontin (methsuximide) must be individualized according to the response of each patient. Optimal dosage is that amount of Celontin (methsuximide) which is barely sufficient to control seizures so that side effects may be kept to a minimum. The smaller capsule (150 mg) facilitates administration to small children. Celontin (methsuximide) may be administered in combination with other anticonvulsants when other forms of epilepsy coexist with absence (petit mal).

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Since Celontin (methsuximide) may interact with concurrently administered antiepileptic drugs, periodic serum level determinations of these drugs may be necessary (eg, methsuximide may increase the plasma concentrations of phenytoin and phenobarbital). Pregnancy To provide information regarding the effects of in utero exposure to Celontin (methsuximide) , physicians are advised to recommend that pregnant patients taking Celontin (methsuximide) enroll in the (NAAED) Pregnancy Registry. This can be done by calling the toll free number 1-888-233-2334, and must be done by patients themselves. Information on the registry can also be found at the website: http://www.aedpregnancyregistry.org/. Read the Celontin Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions Learn More »

Source: http://www.rxlist.com

Celontin (methsuximide) is indicated for the control of absence (petit mal) seizures that are refractory to other drugs.

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Methsuximide should not be used in patients with a history of hypersensitivity to succinimides. Last reviewed on RxList: 11/4/2010
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Source: http://www.rxlist.com

Acute overdoses may produce nausea, vomiting, and CNS depression including coma with respiratory depression. Methsuximide poisoning may follow a biphasic course. Following an initial comatose state, patients have awakened and then relapsed into a coma within 24 hours. It is believed that an active metabolite of methsuximide, N-desmethylmethsuximide, is responsible for this biphasic profile. It is important to follow plasma levels of N-desmethylmethsuximide in methsuximide poisonings. Levels greater than 40 μg/mL have caused toxicity, and coma has been seen at levels of 150 μg/mL. Treatment Treatment should include emesis (unless the patient is or could rapidly become obtunded, comatose, or convulsing) or gastric lavage, activated charcoal, cathartics, and general supportive measures. Charcoal hemoperfusion may be useful in removing the N-desmethyl metabolite of methsuximide. Forced diuresis and exchange transfusions are ineffective.

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N 0071-0525-24 (P-D 525) – Celontin Capsules, #1 capsule each containing 300 mg methsuximide; bottles of 100. N 0071-0537-24 (P-D 537) – Celontin (methsuximide) Capsules, Half-Strength, #3 capsule each containing 150 mg methsuximide; bottles of 100. Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15–30°C (59–86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from light and moisture. Protect from excessive heat 40°C (104°F). Distributed by: Parke-Davis, Division of Pfizer Inc, NY, NY 10017. Revised July 2010 Last reviewed on RxList: 11/4/2010
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Source: http://www.rxlist.com

General It is recommended that the physician withdraw the drug slowly on the appearance of unusual depression, aggressiveness, or other behavioral alterations. As with other anticonvulsants, it is important to proceed slowly when increasing or decreasing dosage, as well as when adding or eliminating other medication. Abrupt withdrawal of anticonvulsant medication may precipitate absence (petit mal) status. Methsuximide, when used alone in mixed types of epilepsy, may increase the frequency of grand mal seizures in some patients. See WARNINGS. Pediatric Use See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION. Last reviewed on RxList: 11/4/2010
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Source: http://www.rxlist.com

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