Drug: Brevicon

Brevicon® (norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol) Tablets provide a continuous oral contraceptive regimen consisting of 21 blue tablets containing norethindrone 0.5 mg and ethinyl estradiol 0.035 mg and 7 orange tablets containing inert ingredients. Norinyl® 1+35 Tablets provide a continuous oral contraceptive regimen consisting of 21 yellow-green tablets containing norethindrone 1 mg and ethinyl estradiol 0.035 mg and 7 orange tablets containing inert ingredients. Norinyl® 1+50 Tablets provide a continuous oral contraceptive regimen consisting of 21 white tablets containing norethindrone 1 mg and mestranol 0.05 mg and 7 orange tablets containing inert ingredients. Norethindrone is a potent progestational agent with the chemical name 17-Hydroxy-19-Nor-17α-pregn-4-en-20-yn-3-one. Ethinyl estradiol is an estrogen with the chemical name 19-nor-17α-pregna-1,3,5(10)-trien-20-yne-3,17-diol. Mestranol is an estrogen with the chemical name 3-Methoxy-19-nor-17α-pregna-1,3,5(10)-trien-20-yn-17-ol. Their structural formulae follow: The blue BREVICON (norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol) tablets contain the following inactive ingredients: FD&C Blue No. 1, lactose, magnesium stearate, povidone, and starch. The yellow-green NORINYL 1+35 tablets contain the following inactive ingredients: D&C Green No. 5, D&C Yellow No. 10, lactose, magnesium stearate, povidone, and starch. The white NORINYL 1+50 tablets contain the following inactive ingredients: lactose, magnesium stearate, povidone, and starch. The inactive orange tablets in the 28-day regimens of BREVICON (norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol) , NORINYL 1+35 and NORINYL 1+50 contain the following ingredients: FD&C Yellow No. 6, lactose, microcrystalline cellulose, and magnesium stearate.

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An increased risk of the following serious adverse reactions has been associated with the use of oral contraceptives (see WARNINGS section):
  • Thrombophlebitis
  • Arterial thromboembolism
  • Pulmonary embolism
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Cerebral hemorrhage
  • Cerebral thrombosis
  • Hypertension
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Hepatic adenomas, carcinomas or benign liver tumors
There is evidence of an association between the following conditions and the use of oral contraceptives, although additional confirmatory studies are needed:
  • Mesenteric thrombosis
  • Retinal thrombosis
The following adverse reactions have been reported in patients receiving oral contraceptives and are believed to be drug-related:
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms (such as abdominal cramps and bloating)
  • Breakthrough bleeding
  • Spotting
  • Change in menstrual flow
  • Amenorrhea
  • Temporary infertility after discontinuation of treatment
  • Edema
  • Melasma which may persist
  • Breast changes: tenderness, enlargement, secretion
  • Change in weight (increase or decrease)
  • Change in cervical erosion and secretion
  • Diminution in lactation when given immediately postpartum
  • Cholestatic jaundice
  • Migraine
  • Rash (allergic)
  • Mental depression
  • Reduced tolerance to carbohydrates
  • Vaginal candidiasis
  • Change in corneal curvature (steepening)
  • Intolerance to contact lenses
The following adverse reactions have been reported in users of oral contraceptives and the association has been neither confirmed nor refuted:
  • Pre-menstrual syndrome
  • Cataracts
  • Changes in appetite
  • Cystitis-like syndrome
  • Headache
  • Nervousness
  • Dizziness
  • Hirsutism
  • Loss of scalp hair
  • Erythema multiforme
  • Erythema nodosum
  • Hemorrhagic eruption
  • Vaginitis
  • Porphyria
  • Impaired renal function
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome
  • Budd-Chiari syndrome
  • Acne
  • Changes in libido
  • Colitis
Read the Brevicon (norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effectsLearn More »

Source: http://www.rxlist.com

To achieve maximum contraceptive effectiveness, oral contraceptives must be taken exactly as directed and at intervals not exceeding 24 hours. 28-Day Schedule: For a DAY 1 START, count the first day of menstrual flow as Day 1 and the first tablet (white or yellow-green or blue) is then taken on Day 1. For a SUNDAY START when menstrual flow begins on or before Sunday, the first tablet (white or yellow-green or blue) is taken on that day. With either a Day 1 START or SUNDAY START, 1 tablet (white or yellow-green or blue) is taken each day at the same time for 21 days. Then the orange tablets are taken for 7 days, whether bleeding has stopped or not. After all 28 tablets have been taken, whether bleeding has stopped or not, the same dosage schedule is repeated beginning on the following day. Instructions To Patients
  • To achieve maximum contraceptive effectiveness, the oral contraceptive pill must be taken exactly as directed and at intervals not exceeding 24 hours.
  • Important: Women should be instructed to use an additional method of protection until after the first 7 days of administration in the initial cycle.
  • Due to the normally increased risk of thromboembolism occurring postpartum, women should be instructed not to initiate treatment with oral contraceptives earlier than 4-6 weeks after a full-term delivery. If pregnancy is terminated in the first 12 weeks, the patient should be instructed to start oral contraceptives immediately or within 7 days. If pregnancy is terminated after 12 weeks, the patient should be instructed to start oral contraceptives after 2 weeks.33, 77
  • If spotting or breakthrough bleeding should occur, the patient should continue the medication according to the schedule. Should spotting or breakthrough bleeding persist, the patient should notify her physician.
  • If the patient misses 1 pill, she should be instructed to take it as soon as she remembers and then take the next pill at the regular time. The patient should be advised that missing a pill can cause spotting or light bleeding and that she may be a little sick to her stomach on the days she takes the missed pill with her regularly scheduled pill. If the patient has missed more than one pill, see DETAILED PATIENT LABELING: HOW TO TAKE THE PILL, WHAT TO DO IF YOU MISS PILLS.
  • Use of oral contraceptives in the event of a missed menstrual period:
    1. If the patient has not adhered to the prescribed dosage regimen, the possibility of pregnancy should be considered after the first missed period and oral contraceptives should be withheld until pregnancy has been ruled out.
    2. If the patient has adhered to the prescribed regimen and misses 2 consecutive periods, pregnancy should be ruled out before continuing the contraceptive regimen.

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Reduced efficacy and increased incidence of breakthrough bleeding and menstrual irregularities have been associated with concomitant use of rifampin. A similar association though less marked, has been suggested with barbiturates, phenylbutazone, phenytoin sodium, and possibly with griseofulvin, ampicillin and tetracyclines.76 Interactions With Laboratory Tests Certain endocrine and liver function tests and blood components may be affected by oral contraceptives:
  1. Increased prothrombin and factors VII, VIII, IX, and X; decreased antithrombin 3; increased norepinephrine-induced platelet aggregability.
  2. Increased thyroid binding globulin (TBG) leading to increased circulating total thyroid hormone, as measured by protein-bound iodine (PBI), T4 by column or by radioimmunoassay. Free T3 resin uptake is decreased, reflecting the elevated TBG. Free T4 concentration is unaltered.
  3. Other binding proteins may be elevated in serum.
  4. Sex steroid binding globulins are increased and result in elevated levels of total circulating sex steroids and corticoids; however, free or biologically active levels remain unchanged.
  5. Triglycerides may be increased.
  6. Glucose tolerance may be decreased.
  7. Serum folate levels may be depressed by oral contraceptive therapy. This may be of clinical significance if a woman becomes pregnant shortly after discontinuing oral contraceptives.
Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2009
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Source: http://www.rxlist.com

Oral contraceptives are indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women who elect to use this product as a method of contraception. Oral contraceptive products such as Norinyl 1+50, which contain 50 mcg of estrogen, should not be used unless medically indicated. Oral contraceptives are highly effective. Table 1 lists the typical accidental pregnancy rates for users of combination oral contraceptives and other methods of contraception.1 The efficacy of these contraceptive methods, except sterilization, depends upon the reliability with which they are used. Correct and consistent use of methods can result in lower failure rates. Table I: Percentage of women experiencing an unintended pregnancy during the first year of typical use and the first year of perfect use of contraception and the percentage continuing use at the end of the first year. United States.
Method % of Women Experiencing an Unintended Pregnancy within the First Year of Use % of Women Continuing Use at One Year3 Typical Use1 Perfect Use2 (1) (2) (3) (4) Chance4 85 85   Spermicides5 26 6 40 Periodic abstinence 25   63 Calendar   9   Ovulation method   3   Sympto-thermal6   2   Post-ovulation   1   Withdrawal 19 4   Cap7         Parous women 40 26 42   Nulliparous women 20 9 56 Sponge         Parous women 40 20 42   Nulliparous women 20 9 56   Diaphragm7 20 6 56 Condom8         Female (Reality) 21 5 56   Male 14 3 61   Pill 5   71   Progestin only   0.5     Combined   0.1   IUD         Progesterone T 2 1.5 81   Copper T 380A 0.8 0.6 78   LNg 20 0.1 0.1 81   Depo-Provera 0.3 0.3 70   Norplant and Norplant-2 0.05 0.05 88   Female sterilization 0.5 0.5 100   Male sterilization 0.15 0.1 100 Emergency Contraceptive Pills: Treatment initiated within 72 hours after unprotected intercourse reduces the risk of pregnancy by at least 75%.9
Lactational Amenorrhea Method: LAM is a highly effective, temporary method of contraception.10
Source: Trussell J. Contraceptive Efficacy Table from Hatcher RA, Trussell J, Stewart F, Cates W, Stewart GK, Kowal D, Guest F, in Contraceptive Technology: Seventeenth Revised Edition. New York, NY: Irvington Publishers, 1998.
1 Among typical couples who initiate use of a method (not necessarily for the first time), the percentage who experience an accidental pregnancy during the first year if they do not stop use for any other reason.
2 Among couples who initiate use of a method (not necessarily for the first time) and who use it perfectly (both consistently and correctly), the percentage who experience an accidental pregnancy during the first year if they do not stop use for any other reason.
3 Among couples attempting to avoid pregnancy, the percentage who continue to use a method for one year.
4 The percents becoming pregnant in columns (2) and (3) are based on data from populations where contraception is not used and from women who cease using contraception in order to become pregnant. Among such populations, about 89% become pregnant within one year. This estimate was lowered slightly (to 85%) to represent the percent who would become pregnant within one year among women now relying on reversible methods of contraception if they abandoned contraception altogether.
5 Foams, creams, gels, vaginal suppositories, and vaginal film.
6Cervical mucus (ovulation) method supplemented by calendar in the pre-ovulatory and basal body temperature in the post-ovulatory phases.
7 With spermicidal cream or jelly.
8 Without spermicides.
9 The treatment schedule is one dose within 72 hours after unprotected intercourse and a second dose 12 hours after the first dose. The Food and Drug Administration has declared the following brands of oral contraceptives to be safe and effective for emergency contraception: Ovral (1 dose is 2 white pills), Aleese (1 dose is 5 pink pills), Nordette or Levlen (1 dose is 2 light-orange pills), Lo/Ovral (1 dose is 4 white pills), Triphasil or Tri-Levlen (1 dose is 4 yellow pills).
10 However, to maintain effective protection against pregnancy, another method of contraception must be used as soon as menstruation resumes, the frequency or duration of breastfeeds is reduced, bottle feeds are introduced, or the baby reaches six months of age.

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Oral contraceptives should not be used in women who have the following conditions:
  • Thrombophlebitis and thromboembolic disorders
  • A past history of deep vein thrombophlebitis or thromboembolic disorders
  • Cerebral vascular or coronary artery disease
  • Known or suspected carcinoma of the breast
  • Carcinoma of the endometrium or other known or suspected estrogen-dependent neoplasia
  • Undiagnosed abnormal genital bleeding
  • Cholestatic jaundice of pregnancy or jaundice with prior pill use
  • Hepatic adenomas, carcinomas or benign liver tumors
  • Known or suspected pregnancy
REFERENCES 6. The Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study of the Centers for Disease Control: JAMA 249(2):1596-1599, 1983. 7. The Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study of the Centers for Disease Control: JAMA 257(6):796-800, 1987. 8. Ory, H.W.: JAMA 228(1):68-69, 1974. 9. Ory, H.W., et al.: N Engl J Med 294:419-422, 1976. 10. Ory, H.W.: Fam Plann Perspect 14:182-184, 1982. 11. Ory, H.W., et al.: Making Choices, New York, The Alan Guttmacher Institute, 1983. Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2009
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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Serious ill effects have not been reported following acute ingestion of large doses of oral contraceptives by young children. Overdosage may cause nausea, and withdrawal bleeding may occur in females. Non-Contraceptive Health Benefits The following non-contraceptive health benefits related to the use of oral contraceptives are supported by epidemiological studies which largely utilized oral contraceptive formulations containing estrogen doses exceeding 0.035 mg of ethinyl estradiol or 0.05 mg of menstranol.6-11 Effects on menses:
  • Increased menstrual cycle regularity
  • Decreased blood loss and decreased incidence of iron deficiency anemia
  • Decreased incidence of dysmenorrhea
Effects related to inhibition of ovulation:
  • Decreased incidence of functional ovarian cysts
  • Decreased incidence of ectopic pregnancies
Effects from long-term use:
  • Decreased incidence of fibroadenomas and fibrocystic disease of the breast
  • Decreased incidence of acute pelvic inflammatory disease
  • Decreased incidence of endometrial cancer
  • Decreased incidence of ovarian cancer
Keep this and all medication out of the reach of children.

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Brevicon® (norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol tablets USP) are packaged in cartons of 3 tablet dispensers. Each dispenser contains 21 blue active tablets, round in shape with Watson debossed on one side and 254 on the other side and 7 orange inert tablets. The 7 orange inert tablets are round in shape with Watson debossed on one side and P1 on the other side. Norinyl®1+35 (norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol tablets USP) are packaged in cartons of 3 and 6 tablet dispensers. Each dispenser contains 21 yellow-green active tablets, round in shape with Watson debossed on one side and 259 on the other side and 7 orange inert tablets. The 7 orange inert tablets are round in shape with Watson debossed on one side and P1 on the other side. Norinyl®1+50 (norethindrone and mestranol tablets USP) are packaged in cartons of 3 and 6 tablet dispensers. Each dispenser contains 21 white active tablets, round in shape with Watson debossed on one side and 265 on the other side and 7 orange inert tablets. The 7 orange inert tablets are round in shape with Watson debossed on one side and P1 on the other side. Store at controlled room temperature 15-25°C (59-77°F). REFERENCES 1. Trussell J. Contraceptive Efficacy Table from Hatcher R.A., Trussell J, Stewart F, Cates W, Stewart GK, Kowal D, Guest F, in Contraceptive Technology: Seventeenth Revised Edition. New York, NY: Irvington Publishers, 1998. 33. Mishell, D.R., et al.: Reproductive Endocrinology, Philadelphia, F.A. Davis Co., 1979. 77. Dickey, R.P.: Managing Contraceptive Pill Patients, Oklahoma, Creative Informatics Inc., 1984. Address medical inquiries to: Watson Pharma, Inc., Medical Communications, P.O. Box 1953, Morristown, NJ 07962-1953. 800-272-5525. Distributed by: WATSON PHARMA, INC., A subsidiary of Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Corona, CA 92880 USA. Manufactured by: Patheon, Inc., Mississauga, Ontario L5N 7K9, CANADA. FDA revision date: 8/15/2001 Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2009
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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General Patients should be counseled that this product does not protect against HIV infection (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases. Physical Examination And Follow-Up It is good medical practice for all women to have annual history and physical examinations, including women using oral contraceptives. The physical examination, however, may be deferred until after initiation of oral contraceptives if requested by the woman and judged appropriate by the clinician. The physical examination should include special reference to blood pressure, breasts, abdomen and pelvic organs, including cervical cytology, and relevant laboratory tests. In case of undiagnosed, persistent or recurrent abnormal vaginal bleeding, appropriate measures should be conducted to rule out malignancy. Women with a strong family history of breast cancer or who have breast nodules should be monitored with particular care. Lipid Disorders Women who are being treated for hyperlipidemias should be followed closely if they elect to use oral contraceptives. Some progestogens may elevate LDL levels and may render the control of hyperlipidemias more difficult. Liver Function If jaundice develops in any woman receiving oral contraceptives the medication should be discontinued. Steroid hormones may be poorly metabolized in patients with impaired liver function. Fluid Retention Oral contraceptives may cause some degree of fluid retention. They should be prescribed with caution, and only with careful monitoring, in patients with conditions which might be aggravated by fluid retention. Emotional Disorders Women with a history of depression should be carefully observed and the drug discontinued if depression recurs to a serious degree. Contact Lenses Contact lens wearers who develop visual changes or changes in lens tolerance should be assessed by an ophthalmologist. Carcinogenesis See WARNINGS section. Pregnancy Pregnancy Category X. See CONTRAINDICATIONS and WARNINGS sections. Nursing Mothers Small amounts of oral contraceptive steroids have been identified in the milk of nursing mothers and a few adverse effects on the child have been reported, including jaundice and breast enlargement. In addition, oral contraceptives given in the postpartum period may interfere with lactation by decreasing the quantity and quality of breast milk. If possible, the nursing mother should be advised not to use oral contraceptives but to use other forms of contraception until she has completely weaned her child. Pediatric Use Safety and efficacy have been established in women of reproductive age. Safety and efficacy are expected to be the same for postpubertal adolescents under the age of 16 and for users 16 years and older. Use of the product before menarche is not indicated. Information for the Patient See PATIENT LABELING. REFERENCES 2. Mann, J., et al.: Br Med J 2(5956):241-245, 1975. 3. Knopp, R.H.: J Reprod Med 31(9):913-921, 1986. 4. Mann, J.I., et al.: Br Med J 2:445-447, 1976. 5. Ory, H.: JAMA 237:2619-2622, 1977. 12. Stadel, B.: N Engl J Med 305(11):612-618, 1981. 13. Stadel, B.: N Engl J Med 305(12):672-677, 1981. 14. Adam, S., et al.: Br J Obstet Gynaecol 88:838-845, 1981. 15. Mann, J., et al.: Br Med J 2(5965):245-248, 1975. 16. Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraceptive Study: Lancet 1:541-546, 1981. 17. Slone, D., et al.: N Engl J Med 305(8):420-424, 1981. 18. Vessey, M.P.: Br J Fam Plann 6 (Supplement):1-12, 1980. 19. Russell-Briefel, R., et al.: Prev Med 5:352-362, 1986. 20. Goldbaum, G., et al.: JAMA 258(10):1339-1342, 1987. 21. LaRosa, J.C.: J Reprod Med 31 (9):906-912, 1986. 22. Krauss, R.M., et al.: Am J Obstet Gynecol 145:446-452, 1983. 23. Wahl, P., et al.: N Engl J Med 308(15):862-867, 1983. 24. Wynn, V., et al.: Am J Obstet Gynecol 142(6):766-771, 1982. 25. Wynn V., et al.: J Reprod Med 31(9):892-897, 1986. 26. Inman, W.H., et al.: Br Med J 2(5599):193-199, 1968. 27. Maguire, M.G., et al.: Am J Epidemiol 110(2):188-195, 1979. 28. Petitti, D., et al.: JAMA 242(11):1150-1154, 1979. 29. Vessey, M.P., et al.: Br Med J 2(5599):199-205, 1968. 30. Vessey, M.P., et al.: Br Med J 2(5658):651-657, 1969. 31. Porter, J.B., et al.: Obstet Gynecol 59(3):299-302, 1982. 32. Vessey, M.P., et al.: J Biosoc Sci 8:373-427, 1976. 33. Mishell, D.R., et al.: Reproductive Endocrinology, Philadelphia, F.A. Davis Co., 1979. 34. Petitti, D.B., et al.: Lancet 2:234-236, 1978. 35. Collaborative Group for the Study of Stroke in Young Women: JAMA 231(7):718-722, 1975. 36. Inman, W.H., et al.: Br Med J 2:203-209, 1970. 37. Meade, T.W., et al.: Br Med J 280(6224):1157-1161, 1980. 38. Kay, C.R.: Am J Obstet Gynecol 142(6):762-765, 1982. 39. Gordon, T., et al.: Am J Med 62:707-714, 1977. 40. Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study: J Coll Gen Pract 33:75-82, 1983. 41. Ory, H.W.: Fam Plann Perspect 15(2):57-63, 1983. 42. Paul, C., et al.: Br Med J 293:723-725, 1986. 43. The Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study of the Centers for Disease Control: N Engl J Med 315(7):405-411, 1986. 44. Pike, M.C., et al.: Lancet 2:926-929, 1983. 45. Miller, D.R., et al.: Obstet Gynecol 68:863-868, 1986. 46. Olsson, H., et al.: Lancet 2:748-749, 1985. 47. McPherson, K., et al.: Br J Cancer 56:653-660, 1987. 48. Huggins, G.R., et al.: Fertil Steril 47(5):733-761, 1987. 49. McPherson, K., et al.: Br Med J 293:709-710, 1986. 50. Ory, H., et al.: Am J Obstet Gynecol 124(6):573-577, 1976. 51. Vessey, M.P., et al.: Lancet 2:930, 1983. 52. Brinton, L.A., et al.: Int J Cancer 38:339-344, 1986. 53. WHO Collaborative Study of Neoplasia and Steroid Contraceptives: Br Med J 290:961-965, 1985. 54. Rooks, J.B., et al.: JAMA 242(7):644-648, 1979. 55. Bein, N.N., et al.: Br J Surg 64:433-435, 1977. 56. Klatskin, G.: Gastroenterology 73:386-394, 1977. 57. Henderson, B.E., et al.: Br J Cancer 48:437-440, 1983. 58. Neuberger, J., et al.: Br Med J 292:1355-1357, 1986. 59. Forman D., et al.: Br Med J 292:1357-1361, 1986. 60. Harlap, S., et al.: Obstet Gynecol 55(4):447-452, 1980. 61. Savolainen, E., et al.: Am J Obstet Gynecol 140(5):521-524, 1981. 62. Janerich, D.T., et al.: Am J Epidemiol 112(1):73-79, 1980. 63. Ferencz, C., et al.: Teratology 21:225-239, 1980. 64. Rothman, K.J., et al.: Am J Epidemiol 109(4):433-439, 1979. 65. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program: Lancet 1:1399-1404, 1973. 66. Royal College of General Practitioners: Oral contraceptives and health. New York, Pittman, 1974. 67. Rome Group for the Epidemiology and Prevention of Cholelithiasis: Am J Epidemiol 119(5):796-805, 1984. 68. Strom, B.L., et al.: Clin Pharmacol Ther 39(3):335-341, 1986. 69. Perlman, J.A., et al.: J Chronic Dis 38(10):857-864, 1985. 70. Wynn, V., et al.: Lancet 1:1045-1049, 1979. 71. Wynn, V.: Progesterone and Progestin, New York, Raven Press, 1983. 72. Wynn, V., et al.: Lancet 2:720-723, 1966. 73. Fisch, I.R., et al.: JAMA 237(23):2499-2503, 1977. 74. Laragh, J.H.: Am J Obstet Gynecol 126(1):141-147, 1976. 75. Ramcharan, S., et al.: Pharmacology of Steroid Contraceptive Drugs, New York, Raven Press, 1977. 76. Stockley, I.: Pharm J 216:140-143, 1976. 78. Porter J.B., Hunter J., Jick H., et al.: Obstet Gynecol 1985;66:1-4. 79. Porter J.B., Hershel J., Walker A.M.: Obstet Gynecol 1987;70:29-32. 80. Fertility and Maternal Health Drugs Advisory Committee, F.D.A., October, 1989. 81. Schlesselman J., Stadel B.V., Murray P., Lai S.: Breast cancer in relation to early use of oral contraceptives. JAMA 1988;259:1828-1833. 82. Hennekens C.H., Speizer F.E., Lipnick R.J., Rosner B., Bain C., Belanger C., Stampfer M.J., Willett W., Peto R.: A case-control study of oral contraceptive use and breast cancer. JNCI 1984;72:39-42. 83. Royal College of General Practitioners: Oral contraceptives, venous thrombosis, and varicose veins. J Coll Gen Pract 28:393-399, 1978. 84. Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study: Effect on Hypertension and benign breast disease of progestogen component in combined oral contraceptives. Lancet 1:624, 1977. Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2009
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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