Drug: Accuretic

ACCURETIC is a fixed-combination tablet that combines an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, quinapril hydrochloride, and a thiazide diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide. Quinapril hydrochloride is chemically described as [3S-[2[R*(R*)], 3R*]]-2-[2-[[1(ethoxycarbonyl)-3-phenylpropyl]amino]-1-oxopropyl]-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3isoquinolinecarboxylic acid, monohydrochloride. Its empirical formula is C25H30N2O5. HCl and its structural formula is: Quinapril hydrochloride is a white to off-white amorphous powder that is freely soluble in aqueous solvents. Hydrochlorothiazide is chemically described as: 6-Chloro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4benzothiadiazine-7-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide. Its empirical formula is C7H8CIN3O4S2 and its structural formula is: Hydrochlorothiazide is a white to off-white, crystalline powder which is slightly soluble in water but freely soluble in sodium hydroxide solution. ACCURETIC is available for oral use as fixed combination tablets in three strengths of quinapril with hydrochlorothiazide: 10 mg with 12.5 mg (ACCURETIC 10/12.5), 20 mg with 12.5 mg (ACCURETIC 20/12.5), and 20 mg with 25 mg (ACCURETIC 20/25). Inactive ingredients: candelilla wax, crospovidone, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hypromellose, iron oxide red, iron oxide yellow, lactose, magnesium carbonate, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, povidone, and titanium dioxide.

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ACCURETIC has been evaluated for safety in 1571 patients in controlled and uncontrolled studies. Of these, 498 were given quinapril plus hydrochlorothiazide for at least 1 year, with 153 patients extending combination therapy for over 2 years. In clinical trials with ACCURETIC, no adverse experience specific to the combination has been observed. Adverse experiences that have occurred have been limited to those that have been previously reported with quinapril or hydrochlorothiazide. Adverse experiences were usually mild and transient, and there was no relationship between side effects and age, sex, race, or duration of therapy. Discontinuation of therapy because of adverse effects was required in 2.1% in patients in controlled studies. The most common reasons for discontinuation of therapy with ACCURETIC were cough (1.0%; see PRECAUTIONS) and headache (0.7%). Adverse experiences probably or possibly related to therapy or of unknown relationship to therapy occurring in 1% or more of the 943 patients treated with quinapril plus hydrochlorothiazide in controlled trials are shown below.   Percent of Patients in Controlled Trials Quinapril/HCTZ
N = 943 Placebo
N = 100 Headache 6.7 30.0 Dizziness 4.8 4.0 Coughing 3.2 2.0 Fatigue 2.9 3.0 Myalgia 2.4 5.0 Viral Infection 1.9 4.0 Rhinitis 2.0 3.0 Nausea and/or Vomiting 1.8 6.0 Abdominal Pain 1.7 4.0 Back Pain 1.5 2.0 Diarrhea 1.4 1.0 Upper Respiratory Infection 1.3 4.0 Insomnia 1.2 2.0 Somnolence 1.2 0.0 Bronchitis 1.2 1.0 Dyspepsia 1.2 2.0 Asthenia 1.1 1.0 Pharyngitis 1.1 2.0 Vasodilatation 1.0 1.0 Vertigo 1.0 2.0 Chest Pain 1.0 2.0 Clinical adverse experiences probably, possibly, or definitely related or of uncertain relationship to therapy occurring in ≥ 0.5% to < 1.0% (except as noted) of the patients treated with quinapril/HCTZ in controlled and uncontrolled trials (N=1571) and less frequent, clinically significant events seen in clinical trials or postmarketing experience (the rarer events are in italics) include (listed by body system): BODY AS A WHOLE: Asthenia, Malaise CARDIOVASCULAR: Palpitation, Tachycardia, Heart Failure, Hyperkalemia, Myocardial Infarction, Cerebrovascular Accident, Hypertensive Crisis, Angina Pectoris, Orthostatic Hypotension, Cardiac Rhythm Disturbance GASTROINTESTINAL: Mouth or Throat Dry, Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage, Pancreatitis, Abnormal Liver Function Tests NERVOUS/PSYCHIATRIC: Nervousness, Vertigo, Paresthesia RESPIRATORY: Sinusitis, Dyspnea INTEGUMENTARY: Pruritus, Sweating Increased, Erythema Multiforme, Exfoliative Dermatitis, Photosensitivity Reaction, Alopecia, Pemphigus UROGENITAL SYSTEM: Acute Renal Failure, Impotence OTHER: Agranulocytosis, Thrombocytopenia, Arthralgia Angioedema: Angioedema has been reported in 0.1% of patients receiving quinapril (0.1%) (see WARNINGS). Postmarketing Experience The following serious nonfatal adverse events, regardless of their relationship to quinapril and HCTZ combination tablets, have been reported during extensive postmarketing experience: BODY AS A WHOLE: Shock, accidental injury, neoplasm, cellulitis, ascites, generalized edema, hernia and anaphylactoid reaction. CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM: Bradycardia, cor pulmonale, vasculitis, and deep thrombosis. DIGESTIVE SYSTEM: Gastrointestinal carcinoma, cholestatic jaundice, hepatitis, esophagitis, vomiting, and diarrhea. EYE DISORDERS: Acute myopia and acute angle closure glaucoma (see WARNINGS). HEMIC SYSTEM: Anemia. METABOLIC AND NUTRITIONAL DISORDERS: Weight loss. MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM: Myopathy, myositis, and arthritis. NERVOUS SYSTEM: Paralysis, hemiplegia, speech disorder, abnormal gait, meningism, and amnesia. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM: Pneumonia, asthma, respiratory infiltration, and lung disorder. SKIN AND APPENDAGES: Urticaria, macropapular rash, and petechiases. SPECIAL SENSES: Abnormal vision. UROGENITAL SYSTEM: Kidney function abnormal, albuminuria, pyuria, hematuria, and nephrosis. Quinapril monotherapy has been evaluated for safety in 4960 patients. In clinical trials adverse events which occurred with quinapril were also seen with ACCURETIC. In addition, the following were reported for quinapril at an incidence > 0.5%: depression, back pain, constipation, syncope, and amblyopia. Hydrochlorothiazide has been extensively prescribed for many years, but there has not been enough systematic collection of data to support an estimate of the frequency of the observed adverse reactions. Within organ-system groups, the reported reactions are listed here in decreasing order of severity, without regard to frequency. BODY AS A WHOLE:Weakness. CARDIOVASCULAR:Orthostatic hypotension (may be potentiated by alcohol, barbiturates, or narcotics). DIGESTIVE:Pancreatitis, jaundice (intrahepatic cholestatic), sialadenitis, vomiting, diarrhea, cramping, nausea, gastric irritation, constipation, and anorexia. NEUROLOGIC:Vertigo, lightheadedness, transient blurred vision, headache, paresthesia, xanthopsia, weakness, and restlessness. MUSCULOSKELETAL:Muscle spasm. HEMATOLOGIC:Aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and hemolytic anemia. RENAL:Renal failure, renal dysfunction, interstitial nephritis (see WARNINGS). METABOLIC: Hyperglycemia, glycosuria, and hyperuricemia. HYPERSENSITIVITY:Necrotizing angiitis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, respiratory distress (including pneumonitis and pulmonary edema), purpura, urticaria, rash, and photosensitivity. Clinical Laboratory Test Findings Serum Electrolytes: See PRECAUTIONS. Creatinine, Blood Urea Nitrogen: Increases ( > 1.25 times the upper limit of normal) in serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were observed in 3% and 4%, respectively, of patients treated with ACCURETIC. Most increases were minor and reversible, which can occur in patients with essential hypertension but most frequently in patients with renal artery stenosis (see PRECAUTIONS). PBI and Tests of Parathyroid Function: See PRECAUTIONS. Hematology: See WARNINGS. Other (causal relationships unknown): Other clinically important changes in standard laboratory tests were rarely associated with ACCURETIC administration. Elevations in uric acid, glucose, magnesium, cholesterol, triglyceride, and calcium (see PRECAUTIONS) have been reported. Read the Accuretic (quinapril hcl/hydrochlorothiazide) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effectsLearn More »

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As individual monotherapy, quinapril is an effective treatment of hypertension in once-daily doses of 10 to 80 mg and hydrochlorothiazide is effective in doses of 12.5 to 50 mg. In clinical trials of quinapril/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy using quinapril doses of 2.5 to 40 mg and hydrochlorothiazide doses of 6.25 to 25 mg, the antihypertensive effects increased with increasing dose of either component. The side effects (see WARNINGS) of quinapril are generally rare and apparently independent of dose; those of hydrochlorothiazide are a mixture of dose-dependent phenomena (primarily hypokalemia) and dose-independent phenomena (e.g., pancreatitis), the former much more common than the latter. Therapy with any combination of quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide will be associated with both sets of dose-independent side effects, but regimens that combine low doses of hydrochlorothiazide with quinapril produce minimal effects on serum potassium. In clinical trials of ACCURETIC, the average change in serum potassium was near zero in subjects who received HCTZ 6.25 mg in the combination, and the average subject who received 10 to 40/12.5 to 25 mg experienced a milder reduction in serum potassium than that experienced by the average subject receiving the same dose of hydrochlorothiazide monotherapy. To minimize dose-independent side effects, it is usually appropriate to begin combination therapy only after a patient has failed to achieve the desired effect with monotherapy. Therapy Guided by Clinical Effect Patients whose blood pressures are not adequately controlled with quinapril monotherapy may instead be given ACCURETIC 10/12.5 or 20/12.5. Further increases of either or both components could depend on clinical response. The hydrochlorothiazide dose should generally not be increased until 2 to 3 weeks have elapsed. Patients whose blood pressures are adequately controlled with 25 mg of daily hydrochlorothiazide, but who experience significant potassium loss with this regimen, may achieve blood pressure control with less electrolyte disturbance if they are switched to ACCURETIC 10/12.5 or 20/12.5. Replacement Therapy For convenience, patients who are adequately treated with 20 mg of quinapril and 25 mg of hydrochlorothiazide and experience no significant electrolyte disturbances may instead wish to receive ACCURETIC 20/25. Use in Renal Impairment Regimens of therapy with ACCURETIC need not take account of renal function as long as the patient's creatinine clearance is > 30 mL/min/1.73 m² (serum creatinine roughly ≤ 3 mg/dL or 265 μmol/L). In patients with more severe renal impairment, loop diuretics are preferred to thiazides. Therefore, ACCURETIC is not recommended for use in these patients.

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Potassium Supplements And Potassium-Sparing Diuretics Potassium-sparing diuretics (spironolactone, amiloride, triamterene, and others) or potassium supplements can increase the risk of hyperkalemia. If concomitant use of such agents is indicated, monitor serum potassium frequently. Lithium Increased serum lithium levels and symptoms of lithium toxicity have been reported in patients receiving ACE inhibitors during therapy with lithium. Because renal clearance of lithium is reduced by thiazides, the risk of lithium toxicity is presumably raised further when, as in therapy with ACCURETIC, a thiazide diuretic is coadministered with the ACE inhibitor. ACCURETIC and lithium should be coadministered with caution, and frequent monitoring of serum lithium levels is recommended. Dual Blockade Of The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) Dual blockade of the RAS with angiotensin receptor blockers, ACE inhibitors, or aliskiren is associated with increased risks of hypotension, hyperkalemia, and changes in renal function (including acute renal failure) compared to monotherapy. Most patients receiving the combination of two RAS inhibitors do not obtain any additional benefit compared to monotherapy. In general, avoid combined use of RAS inhibitors. Closely monitor blood pressure, renal function and electrolytes in patients on ACCURETIC and other agents that affect the RAS. Do not co-administer aliskiren with ACCURETIC in patients with diabetes. Avoid concomitant use of aliskiren with ACCURETIC in patients with renal impairment (GFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m²). Tetracycline And Other Drugs That Interact with Magnesium Simultaneous administration of tetracycline with quinapril reduced the absorption of tetracycline by approximately 28% to 37%, possibly due to the high magnesium content in quinapril tablets. This interaction should be considered if coprescribing quinapril and tetracycline or other drugs that interact with magnesium. Gold Nitritoid reactions (symptoms include facial flushing, nausea, vomiting, and hypotension) have been reported rarely in patients on therapy with injectable gold (sodium aurothiomalate) and concomitant ACE inhibitor therapy. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents including Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors (COX-2 Inhibitors) In patients who are elderly, volume-depleted (including those on diuretic therapy), or with compromised renal function, co-administration of NSAIDs, including selective COX-2 inhibitors, with ACE inhibitors, including quinapril, may result in deterioration of renal function, including possible acute renal failure. These effects are usually reversible. Monitor renal function periodically in patients receiving quinapril and NSAID therapy. The antihypertensive effect of ACE inhibitors, including quinapril may be attenuated by NSAIDs. Agents that inhibit mTOR Patients taking concomitant mTOR inhibitor (e.g. temsirolimus) therapy may be at increased risk for angioedema. Other Agents Drug interaction studies of quinapril and other agents showed:
  • Multiple dose therapy with propranolol or cimetidine has no effect on the pharmacokinetics of single doses of quinapril.
  • The anticoagulant effect of a single dose of warfarin (measured by prothrombin time) was not significantly changed by quinapril coadministration twice daily.
  • Digoxin: Thiazide-induced electrolyte disturbances, i.e. hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, increase the risk of digoxin toxicity, which may lead to fatal arrhythmic events (See PRECAUTIONS).
  • No pharmacokinetic interaction was observed when single doses of quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide were administered concomitantly.
When administered concurrently, the following drugs may interact with thiazide diuretics.
  • Alcohol, Barbiturates, or Narcotics—potentiation of orthostatic hypotension may occur.
  • Antidiabetic Drugs (oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin)—dosage adjustments of the antidiabetic drug may be required (See PRECAUTIONS).
  • Cholestyramine and Colestipol Resin—absorption of hydrochlorothiazide is impaired in the presence of anionic exchange resins. Single doses of either cholestyramine or colestipol resins bind the hydrochlorothiazide and reduce its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract by up to 85% and 43%, respectively.
  • Corticosteroids, ACTH—intensified electrolyte depletion, particularly hypokalemia.
  • Pressor Amines (e.g., norepinephrine)—possible decreased response to pressor amines, but not sufficient to preclude their therapeutic use.
  • Skeletal Muscle Relaxants, Nondepolarizing (e.g., tubocurarine)—possible increased responsiveness to the muscle relaxant.
  • Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs—the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive effects of thiazide diuretics may be reduced by concurrent administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.
Read the Accuretic Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions Learn More »

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Hypertension ACCURETIC is indicated for the treatment of hypertension, to lower blood pressure. Lowering blood pressure reduces the risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, primarily strokes and myocardial infarctions. These benefits have been seen in controlled trials of antihypertensive drugs from a wide variety of pharmacologic classes including the class to which this drug principally belongs. There are no controlled trials demonstrating risk reduction with ACCURETIC. Control of high blood pressure should be part of comprehensive cardiovascular risk management, including, as appropriate, lipid control, diabetes management, antithrombotic therapy, smoking cessation, exercise, and limited sodium intake. Many patients will require more than one drug to achieve blood pressure goals. For specific advice on goals and management, see published guidelines, such as those of the National High Blood Pressure Education Program's Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC). Numerous antihypertensive drugs, from a variety of pharmacologic classes and with different mechanisms of action, have been shown in randomized controlled trials to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and it can be concluded that it is blood pressure reduction, and not some other pharmacologic property of the drugs, that is largely responsible for those benefits. The largest and most consistent cardiovascular outcome benefit has been a reduction in the risk of stroke, but reductions in myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality also have been seen regularly. Elevated systolic or diastolic pressure causes increased cardiovascular risk, and the absolute risk increase per mmHg is greater at higher blood pressures, so that even modest reductions of severe hypertension can provide substantial benefit. Relative risk reduction from blood pressure reduction is similar across populations with varying absolute risk, so the absolute benefit is greater in patients who are at higher risk independent of their hypertension (for example, patients with diabetes or hyperlipidemia), and such patients would be expected to benefit from more aggressive treatment to a lower blood pressure goal. Some antihypertensive drugs have smaller blood pressure effects (as monotherapy) in black patients, and many antihypertensive drugs have additional approved indications and effects (e.g., on angina, heart failure, or diabetic kidney disease). These considerations may guide selection of therapy. This fixed combination is not indicated for the initial therapy of hypertension (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). In using ACCURETIC, consideration should be given to the fact that another angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, has caused agranulocytosis, particularly in patients with renal impairment or collagen-vascular disease. Available data are insufficient to show that quinapril does not have a similar risk (see WARNINGS: Neutropenia/Agranulocytosis). Angioedema In Black Patients Black patients receiving ACE inhibitor monotherapy have been reported to have a higher incidence of angioedema compared to non-blacks. It should also be noted that in controlled clinical trials, ACE inhibitors have an effect on blood pressure that is less in black patients than in non-blacks.

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ACCURETIC is contraindicated in patients who are hypersensitive to quinapril or hydrochlorothiazide and in patients with a history of angioedema related to previous treatment with an ACE inhibitor. Because of the hydrochlorothiazide components, this product is contraindicated in patients with anuria or hypersensitivity to other sulfonamide-derived drugs. Do not co-administer ACCURETIC with aliskiren:
  • in patients with diabetes.
Last reviewed on RxList: 2/19/2015
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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No specific information is available on the treatment of overdosage with ACCURETIC or quinapril monotherapy; treatment should be symptomatic and supportive. Therapy with ACCURETIC should be discontinued, and the patient should be observed. Dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and hypotension should be treated by established procedures. The oral median lethal dose of quinapril/hydrochlorothiazide in combination ranges from 1063/664 to 4640/2896 mg/kg in mice and rats. Doses of 1440 to 4280 mg/kg of quinapril cause significant lethality in mice and rats. In single-dose studies of hydrochlorothiazide, most rats survived doses up to 2.75 g/kg. Data from human overdoses of ACE inhibitors are scanty; the most likely manifestation of human quinapril overdosage is hypotension. In human hydrochlorothiazide overdose, the most common signs and symptoms observed have been those of dehydration and electrolyte depletion (hypokalemia, hypochloremia, hyponatremia). If digitalis has also been administered, hypokalemia may accentuate cardiac arrhythmias. Laboratory determinations of serum levels of quinapril and its metabolites are not widely available, and such determinations have, in any event, no established role in the management of quinapril overdose. No data are available to suggest physiological maneuvers (e.g., maneuvers to change the pH of the urine) that might accelerate elimination of quinapril and its metabolites. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis have little effect on the elimination of quinapril and quinaprilat. Angiotensin II could presumably serve as a specific antagonist-antidote in the setting of quinapril overdose, but angiotensin II is essentially unavailable outside of scattered research facilities. Because the hypotensive effect of quinapril is achieved through vasodilation and effective hypovolemia, it is reasonable to treat quinapril overdose by infusion of normal saline solution.

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ACCURETIC is available in tablets of three different strengths: 10/12.5 tablets: pink, scored elliptical, biconvex, film-coated tablets coded “PD 222” on one side. Each tablet contains 10 mg of quinapril and 12.5 mg of hydrochlorothiazide. NDC 0071-0222-23: 90 tablet bottles 20/12.5 tablets: pink, scored triangular, film-coated tablets coded “PD 220” on one side. Each tablet contains 20 mg of quinapril and 12.5 mg of hydrochlorothiazide. NDC 0071-0220-23: 90 tablet bottles 20/25 tablets: pink, round, biconvex, film-coated tablets coded “PD 223” on one side. Each tablet contains 20 mg of quinapril and 25 mg of hydrochlorothiazide. NDC 0071-0223-23: 90 tablet bottles Dispense in tight containers as defined in the USP. Store at Controlled Room Temperature 20–25°C (68–77°F) [see USP]. Distributed by: Parke-Davis, Division of Pfizer Inc., NY, NY 10017. Revised July 2014 Last reviewed on RxList: 2/19/2015
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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General Serum Electrolyte Abnormalities In clinical trials, hyperkalemia (serum potassium ≥ 5.8 mmol/L) occurred in approximately 2% of patients receiving quinapril. In most cases, elevated serum potassium levels were isolated values which resolved despite continued therapy. Less than 0.1% of patients discontinued therapy due to hyperkalemia. Hydrochlorothiazide can cause hypokalemia and hyponatremia. Hypomagnesemia can result in hypokalemia which appears difficult to treat despite potassium repletion. Drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system can cause hyperkalemia. The risk of hyperkalemia may be increased in patients with renal insufficiency, diabetes mellitus or with concomitant use of drugs that raise serum potassium (see DRUG INTERACTIONS). The risk of hypokalemia may be increased in patients with cirrhosis, brisk diuresis, or with concomitant use of drugs that lower serum potassium. Monitor serum electrolytes periodically. Other Metabolic Disturbances Hydrochlorothiazide may alter glucose tolerance and raise serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Hydrochlorothiazide may raise the serum uric acid level due to reduced clearance of uric acid and may cause or exacerbate hyperuricemia and precipitate gout in susceptible patients. Hydrochlorothiazide decreases urinary calcium excretion and may cause elevations of serum calcium. Monitor calcium levels in patients with hypercalcemia receiving ACCURETIC. Cough Presumably due to the inhibition of the degradation of endogenous bradykinin, persistent nonproductive cough has been reported with all ACE inhibitors, resolving after discontinuation of therapy. ACE inhibitor-induced cough should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cough. Surgery/Anesthesia In patients undergoing surgery or during anesthesia with agents that produce hypotension, quinapril will block the angiotensin II formation that could otherwise occur secondary to compensatory renin release. Hypotension that occurs as a result of this mechanism can be corrected by volume expansion. Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment Of Fertility Carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and fertility studies have not been conducted in animals with ACCURETIC. Quinapril hydrochloride was not carcinogenic in mice or rats when given in doses up to 75 or 100 mg/kg/day (50 or 60 times the maximum human daily dose, respectively, on a mg/kg basis and 3.8 or 10 times the maximum human daily dose on a mg/m² basis) for 104 weeks. Female rats given the highest dose level had an increased incidence of mesenteric lymph node hemangiomas and skin/subcutaneous lipomas. Neither quinapril nor quinaprilat were mutagenic in the Ames bacterial assay with or without metabolic activation. Quinapril was also negative in the following genetic toxicology studies: in vitro mammalian cell point mutation, sister chromatid exchange in cultured mammalian cells, micronucleus test with mice, in vitro chromosome aberration with V79 cultured lung cells, and in an in vivo cytogenetic study with rat bone marrow. There were no adverse effects on fertility or reproduction in rats at doses up to 100 mg/kg/day (60 and 10 times the maximum daily human dose when based on mg/kg and mg/m², respectively). Under the auspices of the National Toxicology Program, rats and mice received hydrochlorothiazide in their feed for 2 years, at doses up to 600 mg/kg/day in mice and up to 100 mg/kg/day in rats. These studies uncovered no evidence of a carcinogenic potential of hydrochlorothiazide in rats or female mice, but there was “equivocal” evidence of hepatocarcinogenicity in male mice. Hydrochlorothiazide was not genotoxic in in vitro assays using strains TA 98, TA 100, TA 1535, TA 1537, and TA 1538 of Salmonella typhimurium (the Ames test); in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) test for chromosomal aberrations; or in vivo assays using mouse germinal cell chromosomes, Chinese hamster bone marrow chromosomes, and the Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal trait gene. Positive test results were obtained in the in vitro CHO sister chromatid exchange (clastogenicity) test and in the mouse lymphoma cell (mutagenicity) assays, using concentrations of hydrochlorothiazide of 43 to 1300 μg/mL. Positive test results were also obtained in the Aspergillus nidulans nondisjunction assay, using an unspecified concentration of hydrochlorothiazide. Hydrochlorothiazide had no adverse effects on the fertility of mice and rats of either sex in studies wherein these species were exposed, via their diets, to doses of up to 100 and 4 mg/kg/day, respectively, prior to mating and throughout gestation. Nursing Mothers Because quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide are secreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when ACCURETIC is administered to a nursing woman. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from hydrochlorothiazide and the unknown effects of quinapril in infants, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue ACCURETIC, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. Geriatric Use Clinical studies of quinapril HCl/hydrochlorothiazide did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy. Pediatric Use Neonates with a history of in utero exposure to ACCURETIC: If oliguria or hypotension occurs, direct attention toward support of blood pressure and renal perfusion. Exchange transfusions or dialysis may be required as a means of reversing hypotension and/or substituting for disordered renal function. Removal of quinapril, which crosses the placenta, from the neonatal circulation is not significantly accelerated by these means. Safety and effectiveness of ACCURETIC in children have not been established. Last reviewed on RxList: 2/19/2015
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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